Bike Arc Modular Bike Park System

Some cool bikes images:

Bike Arc Modular Bike Park System
bikes

Image by Richard Masoner / Cyclelicious

A prototype of a fancy bike rack at the corner of University & Alma in Palo Alto.

Bike, Chipping Campden
bikes

Image by simpologist
The plants are fake. The bike seemed real enough, though.

15 thoughts on “Bike Arc Modular Bike Park System

  1. Richard Masoner / Cyclelicious

    This rack was design by Jeff Selzer, the guy who runs Palo Alto Bikes, not by the city. But I agree it’s a violation of the KISS principle.

    Reply
  2. banter

    I didn’t know that. But I’m guessing the city hired him, permitted him, and funded him to make this fairly useless bike rack.

    Reply
  3. Arc Jeff

    Hey I just ran across this and thought I might add a little light to the thread. I am Jeff Selzer one of the guys who developed the Bike Arc. I appreciate all the feedback. Our desire was to create a rack that would honor the bike. That is to say not scratch it, lean it, or other wise damage the bike when placed in a rack. We also wanted to cut down on the footprint of the bike. By cantilevering it over landscape we minimize the footprint on the sidewalk. This is not a City of Palo Alto project they did not commission it nor in anyway pay for it. This is a Bike Arc LLC project only. If you would like additional information go to our website http://www.bikearc.com

    Reply
  4. Richard Masoner / Cyclelicious

    Jeff, thanks for commenting here. Now that you mention it the cantilevered space-saving aspect is now obvious and, I gotta admit, pretty clever.

    Something I hadn’t thought of before: With the bike basically wedged into place, it appears leverage attacks (where the bike frame itself is twisted around to break a lock) are much more difficulty with this like of rack.

    Reply
  5. henry in a'dam

    So I’m looking at the racks again and thinking my first ironic comment was much too harsh. A couple suggestions though:

    1. The main locking points seem to be the circular things by the rear wheel, but that’s a busy and dirty area. On many bikes it’d be difficult to shove a chain or cable through there without getting your hands dirty. I’d make those much bigger and/or provide a secondary locking point.

    2. Having all the handlebars at the same height (and lots of mountain/hybrid bikes with wide handlebars) really limits how closely the bikes can be squeezed together. Here in the Netherlands there are vaguely similar racks but they alternate between high and low positions to avoid handlebar interference.

    3. It’s not yet an issue there, but if cycling takes off you’ll need to accommodate front carriers. Some front fenders might also interfere with these racks, particularly on longer wheelbase bikes.

    Jeff, You probably don’t realize who I am: Henry Cutler, and I’ll be in the Bay Area in a couple weeks. Are you still at Palo Alto Bikes? I’d be good to connect.

    Reply
  6. * sharon - sparkles *

    This shot is beautiful. The blue is stunning against the neutral stone. Thank you for sharing! :)

    Reply

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